Programme

The Future of the Past: Who Makes History?

“History will be kind to me for I intend to write it.” Winston Churchill made his […] Read more

“History will be kind to me for I intend to write it.” Winston Churchill made his now famous speech at an event that many have seen as the symbolic inauguration of the Cold War. Precisely, it asserts that the historical narratives are always shaped by the might of political and cultural leaders on the winning side of history. Many historical events, such as the Nanking Massacre, the Jeju Uprising and the February 28 Incident, are often dealt with in abridged or distorted form in the official historical discourse. While those in authority may have the power to manipulate the history to attain their present-day goals, there is an alternative narrative beyond political exploitation – a “public history” through movies.

While those in authority may have the power to manipulate the history to attain their present-day goals, there is an alternative narrative beyond political exploitation – a “public history” through movies. Film is a powerful art form that can present a genuine reflection of people’s views and sentiments toward history, giving a voice to the individuals who take part in the events, and influencing the way people think about the past. Film is also an important mechanism reminding us that history is not monolithic, that there are always strong contingents in opposition to dominant ideologies. In collaboration with the Goethe-Institut, Cine Fan brings to you “The Future of the Past: Who Makes History?” curated by film scholars from Germany and the presenters in Hong Kong, China, Taiwan, Korea and Japan. The selected films, in reproducing the vernacular memory in the everyday lives of ordinary people, reflect the truth of the past. These stories, of a Korean student soldier fighting for the Japanese army; of a group of Hong Kong idealists advocating for socio-political reforms; or of a Japanese young man living under the oppression of imperialism, all evoke a critical collective memory of the past, expanding the opportunity to contemplate the role of ordinary individuals in history. History is not only about the past, but also about the present. Films, with the unparalleled cinematic representation of the public history, bring history to life for everyone, inspiring us to preserve the

In collaboration with the Goethe-Institut, Cine Fan brings to you “The Future of the Past: Who Makes History?” curated by film scholars from Germany and the presenters in Hong Kong, China, Taiwan, Korea and Japan. The selected films, in reproducing the vernacular memory in the everyday lives of ordinary people, reflect the truth of the past. These stories, of a Korean student soldier fighting for the Japanese army; of a group of Hong Kong idealists advocating for socio-political reforms; or of a Japanese young man living under the oppression of imperialism, all evoke a critical collective memory of the past, expanding the opportunity to contemplate the role of ordinary individuals in history. History is not only about the past, but also about the present. Films, with the unparalleled cinematic representation of the public history, bring history to life for everyone, inspiring us to preserve the

History is not only about the past, but also about the present. Films, with the unparalleled cinematic representation of the public history, bring history to life for everyone, inspiring us to preserve the past, and embrace the future.

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